Granite Is Ideal for Kitchen Countertops

Granite is an igneous rock formed from liquid magma, cooled slowly to form a substance approaching the hardness and durability of diamond. Its hardness and density comes from the fact that it has been solidified within the earth under extreme pressure. It consists of feldspar, quartz, mica, and other minerals that all contribute to the unique coloration and texture of each granite deposit. Granite is considered an ideal choice for kitchen countertops because it can withstand high heat (up to 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit). Granite countertops are virtually scratch-proof and will not scratch even when directly cut on.


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Quartzite Countertops

Quartzite is a metamorphic rock that originated as quartz-based sandstone. Through a process of high heating and pressurization, sandstone is transformed into quartzite. Pure quartzite countertops are typically a white or gray shade. The presence of additional minerals can impart hues of vivid colors like green, blue, or red. On the Mohs Scale of Hardness, pure quartzite has been given a hardness reading of 7 out of 10 (10 being the hardest) – harder than granite! If you are looking for the aesthetic quality of marble, quartzites are a viable option to consider. They are a much harder material than marble, which decreases their susceptibility to damages from regular wear and tear.

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Marble Countertops 

Marble is a metamorphic rock formed from the recrystallization of limestone under intense pressure and high temperatures within the earth. During this process, other minerals are introduced into the structure, which produce beautiful colors and veining which characterize marble. Marble countertop colors vary from white to black, being sometimes yellow, red and green, and frequently beautifully veined or clouded. Marble is scratch- and stain-prone, as it is not as hard as a granite surface. It is not preferred in the kitchen, but works well in bathrooms, on hearths, and in some furniture applications.


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Soapstone 

Soapstone is a metamorphic rock made up of mineral deposits created by nature and quarried from the earth. The main mineral components in soapstone are talc, chlorite, dolomite, and magnesite. Soapstone is typically gray, bluish, or green in color, with light flowing veins or variegations. Its name is derived from its “soapy” feel and softness. It is very resistant to heat, which makes it suitable for kitchen countertops and woodstoves. Soapstone turns to a darker charcoal color with use or when treated with mineral oil. It is perfect for achieving that warm “old-fashioned,” “rustic,” “early-American” look. It’s also versatile enough to be used with very modern designs.


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Onyx 

Onyx is a sedimentary rock, formed as stalactites and stalagmites in limestone cave interiors. It is formed of bands of chalcedony in alternating colors. Onyx is cryptocrystalline, consisting of fine intergrowths of the silica minerals quartz and moganite. Onyx’s fascinating patterns and unique translucent qualities are a result of its softer and somewhat more fragile qualities, and so careful thought must be given to the location of the onyx countertops and what their purpose is going to be. Onyx is well-suited for furniture pieces, bathrooms, and fireplace surrounds.

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Travertine Stone

Travertine is a sedimentary rock which has been highly affected by the forces of underground springs and subterranean rivers. Mostly made of calcite, travertine stone is the middle stage of limestone evolving into marble. It is a very porous material, with holes/pits that were generated either by gasses trapped by the sediments or by water plants that were trapped inside the formation and then decomposed. It is highly susceptible to heat, scratching, staining, and acidity, and is not recommended for kitchen projects.


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Limestone

Limestone is a sedimentary rock, which means it was formed from small particles of rock or stone that have been compacted by pressure. Because limestone is often formed from shells and bones, it is a light color like white, tan, or gray. The color of the limestone depends on the other sediments in the mixture besides the mineral calcite, which is white; impurities such as sand, clay, and organic material are also present in limestone and affect the color. The skeletal fragments of marine organisms visible on limestone countertops create a very unique surface. Due to their fragility and susceptibility to scratching, staining, and etching, limestone countertops are best suited for low-traffic areas.


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Engineered Quartz Stone for Countertops

Engineered quartz stone is manufactured from a mix of approximately 93% crushed natural stone (including quartz), a resin binder, pigments, and additives. The marriage between stone and resin is completed under intense heat and pressure. The end result is a non-porous material, a very nice attribute for a countertop surface. Engineered stone slabs and countertops are available in a wide range of colors, patterns, and even textures. Unlike natural stone surfaces, man-made quartz has consistency of shade of colors and patterns with little variability. It is ideal for people who want uniformity in their countertops.


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Engineered Quartz Stone for Countertops

Engineered quartz stone is manufactured from a mix of approximately 93% crushed natural stone (including quartz), a resin binder, pigments, and additives. The marriage between stone and resin is completed under intense heat and pressure. The end result is a non-porous material, a very nice attribute for a countertop surface. Engineered stone slabs and countertops are available in a wide range of colors, patterns, and even textures. Unlike natural stone surfaces, man-made quartz has consistency of shade of colors and patterns with little variability. It is ideal for people who want uniformity in their countertops.


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